writing, Writing Tips

Writing for Short Formats: 3 Free Sites You Should Know

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Something that was impressed upon me earlier this month was the importance of being rejected. Yes, you read that correctly. Rejections happen for many reasons and a productive writer will collect more than a few. Literary Hub has an excellent article about why it’s important to set rejection goals.

Rejections (and acceptances) mean you’re actively writing and submitting your work for publication. But how do you choose where to send your work in the first place? If you’re working in a short format (essays, short stories, flash fiction, microfiction, and poetry), there’s a broad array of digital and print magazines and anthologies looking for submissions. Some publications have a rolling submission acceptance period while others have a small window. Some accept unsolicited submissions while others do not. Wading through the requirements for each one can become overwhelming. Luckily, there are a few filter sites that can help you narrow this process down. The following are free, but there are subscription-based ones out there, as well.

The Review Review

This one is my personal favorite so far. You can filter your search by reading period, response time, reading fee, payment level, format (digital or print), and whether or not the publication accepts reprints. Not only does it filter magazines who want fiction, non-fiction, and poetry, but it also searches for art and drama. They also have an in-depth blog which I highly recommend.

Poets and Writers

This was one of the first sites I found. You can search for broad categories such as fiction, poetry, and creative non-fiction. However, you can narrow this search by the following subgenres:

  • Autobiography/Memoir
  • Commercial Fiction
  • Cross-genre
  • Erotica
  • Experimental
  • Feminist
  • Flash Fiction
  • Formal
  • Graphic/Illustrated
  • Healing/Health
  • Historical
  • Humor
  • Journalism/Investigative Reporting
  • LGBT
  • Literary Fiction
  • Love
  • Micropoetry
  • Narrative Non-fiction
  • Nature/Environmental
  • Political
  • Pop Culture
  • Prose Poetry
  • Regional
  • Religion/Spiritual
  • Serialized Fiction
  • Translation
  • War

The advanced filter options allow you to search by payment level and format (web, e-publication, print, audio, video). I did run into a couple of instances where the magazine’s information had changed from what was listed in the database (submission window suddenly closed or a publication had gone on hiatus due to financial difficulties) so be sure to read each website thoroughly before attempting to submit anything — which you should be doing anyway.

The Grinder

This site is for fiction only. You can filter your search by genre, story subject, story style, and story length (flash, short, novelette, novella, novel, story collection, novel excerpt). In addition to these, you can specify word length, minimum payment (cents per word), average response time, whether they accept electronic or postal submissions, and whether the magazine has won or been nominated for awards. This can be narrowed down even further by magazines which accept simultaneous submissions, reprints, and multiple pieces. You can also ask the search to only show anthologies or contests. If fiction is your specialty, this is the place to go.

 

Once you’ve found a magazine you’re interested in, be sure to read their submission guidelines thoroughly. It also helps to read through a few of their previous issues to get a sense of what they are interested in printing. If you’re submitting a short story and their site doesn’t have special formatting requirements, it’s a good idea to stick to Standard Manuscript Format.

Many of the magazines I’ve come across so far use Submittable to handle unsolicited submissions. Creating a profile is free and simple. (If you haven’t guessed by now, “free” and “simple” are two of my favorite words.) Not only do many publications require you to have an account before submitting, Submittable helps you track what you’ve sent where and when. They even tell you where your work is in the process, which is pretty great.

One last note. You may not receive a personal response after submitting to a publication, and any response you do receive may not be for several months down the road. Editors and publishers have a huge workload, and it takes time to wade through all the mush. So instead of obsessively checking your Submittable profile to see if your work has been rejected (or accepted) yet, try submitting to another magazine.

Do you have any favorite literary magazines or submission filter sites? Share them in the comments below.

 

 


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