If You Liked 'The Butterfly Effect,' Read This Book
Book Reviews

If You Liked ‘The Butterfly Effect,’ Read This Book

If you could go back in time, what would you change?

If You Liked 'The Butterfly Effect,' Read This Book

This post contains affiliate links. That means I earn a commission from clicks or purchases made through these links at no cost to you.

Today we’re visiting another book by the author I gushed about in this earlier post. And, no, this book is not in the Quantum Cop series. But it still contemplates the nature of our reality. So what is this mystery book?

Temporal Dreams, by Lesley L. Smith is an emotional journey with two main characters. Kairi is an orphan and a college student who discovers a latent ability to travel back in time while she sleeps. Meanwhile on the other side of the world, Kyle has been training with his family his whole life to prepare for the Dreaming, or time travel. Time travel can be incredibly dangerous, and there are a lot of rules to follow to avoid breaking reality. Rules that Kairi doesn’t know. Will everyone survive all her changes to the timeline? And is somebody manipulating Kyle and his family into Dream related accidents?

This was a page-turner with a plot twist that I never even suspected. But it also explores the bonds between friends and family. Plus, there’s a neat little spin on déjà vu.

Rating: 5 out of 5


You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning · Loreless · Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better · I Was Picked: The John Challis Story · The Touch: A Supernatural Story · Jake & The Dragons of Asheville · Kat Cubed · Transgender Manifesto · The Stolen Sky · Quantum Murder

A Thrilling Sci-Fi Book Written by a Woman Scientist
Book Reviews

A Thrilling Sci-Fi Book Written by a Woman Scientist

This tale’s a thrilling ride through time and space.

A Thrilling Sci-Fi Book Written by a Woman Scientist
This post contains affiliate links. That means I earn a commission from clicks or purchases made through these links at no cost to you.

This week’s book is by a woman who is quickly becoming one of my favorite indie authors. Wielding a Ph.D. in Elementary Particle Physics and an MFA in Writing Popular Fiction, Lesley L. Smith brings a lot to the literary table. The book I’m reviewing today is the second in a series. As I’ve mentioned time and again, I rarely read book series in order and this time is no exception. I jumped into this book with both feet and absolutely no idea what happened in book one. And I was not disappointed.

Quantum Murder is an action-packed adventure with thrilling highs and lows. I gravitate towards books with catchy first lines, and the opening line of this book definitely hits the mark:

“My morning was going great until I got arrested for murder.” ~Quantum Murder by Lesley L. Smith

The protagonist, Madison Martin, is a physicist and professor who discovered a way to manipulate reality (I’m assuming this occurred in book one). She and a select few others are able to create, destroy, and teleport at will. As you can imagine, this kind of power leads to some dire consequences. But the book is deeper than a typical Sci-Fi or Mystery complete-the-quest or solve-the-murder trope. The narrative touches on romance from the woman’s perspective, which is totally empowering and completely different from the majority of traditional male-gaze narratives in Sci-Fi. Seeing the world through the eyes of a brilliant woman scientist is refreshing. And the plotting isn’t too shabby, either.

Rating: 5 out of 5


You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning · Loreless · Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better · I Was Picked: The John Challis Story · The Touch: A Supernatural Story · Jake & The Dragons of Asheville · Kat Cubed · Transgender Manifesto · The Stolen Sky

My Absolute Favorite Books I Read This Year
Book Reviews

My Absolute Favorite Books I Read This Year

Brown paper packages tied up with strings, these are a few of my favorite books.

My Absolute Favorite Books I Read This Year

I get a commission for purchases made through links in this post at no cost to you.

As we approach the end of the year, I’ve been reflecting on the books I’ve read over the past several months. Most have been good or okay. A few were so horrible they made me want to scream or cry or both. But several of them were outstanding for a variety of reasons. Here is a list of books I would totally, absolutely, 100% recommend. They are listed in no particular order.

1. Fool Moon

I am a huge fan of the Harry Dresden, or Dresden Files, series by Jim Butcher. These books always have great pacing, action, and plenty of humor. For any of you who’ve read my blog for a while, you know that I rarely read a series in order. This is actually my 6th or 7th Dresden book, even though it’s technically the 2nd in the series. Oops? Haha. It’s still great.

Get It Now

Genres: Urban Fantasy, Werewolves & Shifters, Witches & Wizards, Private Detective

 

2. The Book of Taltos


Yet another book series that I’ve read willy-nilly. The Book of Taltos by Steven Brust is one of the Vlad Taltos series. There’s wry humor, magic, and a shoulder dragon. Need I say more?

Get It Now

Genres: Fantasy, Epic, Sword & Sorcery

 

3. When the Future Comes Too Soon


And here is another book from the middle of a series. When the Future Comes Too Soon by Selina Siak Chin Yoke is a powerful novel. Definitely not as light-hearted as the previous two books, but it’s packed with insight.

Get It Now

Genres: Historical Fiction, Asian American, Cultural Heritage, Family Life

 

4. Don Quixote and Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age


This book had me literally laughing out loud. It smushes a whole bunch of classic literary and pop culture characters together in weird and wacky ways. If you don’t know the characters, though, it might be considerably less funny.

Get It Now

Genres: Humorous, Fantasy

 

5. Known Shippable, Will Not Fix


I loved this indie book to bits. You might find some really negative reviews for this book, but most of them are from before it was re-edited. This book is hilarious, zany, and really inventive.

Get It Now

Genre: Humorous, Science Fiction and Fantasy, Video & Electronic Games

 

6. Kat Cubed


This book combines two things I love to think about: multiverses and quantum mechanics. It also helps that the author has a Ph.D in Particle Physics.

Get It Now

Genres: Science Fiction, Dystopian Fiction, New Adult Fiction

 

7. Smoke City


This book is entirely different from everything on this list. It has some vaguely Hunter S. Thompson vibes and a unique spin on novel structure.

Get It Now


Genres: Magical Realism, Ghosts, Paranormal and Urban

A futuristic and dystopian YA book
Book Reviews

A Futuristic and Dystopian YA Book

It’s a good thing we don’t live in a dystopian society. *cough* *cough*

A futuristic and dystopian YA book

 

This post contains affiliate links. That means I earn a commission from clicks or purchases made through these links at no cost to you.

 

This week’s book is the second in a series. And anyone who’s been following my blog for some time knows that I’m notorious for reading things out of order. I admit that this habit doesn’t allow me to experience the full history of a fictional world or its characters when I jump right into the middle of things. But, it also gives me a good sense of how coherent the world is. As soon as I opened this book, I knew the characters had a history together. And the author included sufficient descriptive details which kept me from becoming disoriented.

So what is today’s book?

The Stolen Sky, by Heather Hansen, hits the ground running. It takes place in a sunless city. More specifically, the city has been divided into multiple levels with the majority of the population dwelling underground. Those on the surface hold all the power and most of the wealth. Meanwhile, those living underground need supplements of VitD (vitamin D, which we get from the sun) in order to avoid a grisly death.

Hansen’s writing really shines in its worldbuilding. The social hierarchy and subtle political machinations are well-planned. It feels like a real living, breathing (or gasping) world.

I would have enjoyed this book even better if the romance between the two main characters didn’t interrupt the action. Because this book has some pretty amazing action scenes. And, overall, I didn’t feel that invested in their relationship. Part of this might be because I haven’t read the first book in the series, so I’m not holding that against this book. But the whole romantic-moment-interrupting-a-life-or-death-situation-with-a-short-timer-on-it is a common trope in books and television. Especially television. To me, it feels forced and unnatural even with two hormone-addled teens.

However, Arden and Dade (the main characters) make other pretty adolescent choices fueled by fear. And this aspect of the characters feels incredibly honest to me. Living in a stressful, dystopian nightmare doesn’t help your brain make great decisions. Even more so when you’re a young adult and your prefrontal cortex is restructuring (think: moodiness and lack of inhibition). All things considered, these characters are resourceful, highly adaptive, and realistic.

Rating: 4.6 out of 5 stars

 

 

 


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning · Loreless · Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better · I Was Picked: The John Challis Story · The Touch: A Supernatural Story · Jake & The Dragons of Asheville · Kat Cubed · Transgender Manifesto

One Book Every Cisgender Person Should Read
Book Reviews

Transgender Manifesto

Transgender people have been around a long time and are here to stay.

One Book Every Cisgender Person Should Read

This week’s read is nonfiction, which is rare for me. It’s also written by a transgender woman about civil rights from the transgender community’s point of view. If this makes you uncomfortable, then you should really read this book. At the very least, you can walk away from it with a better understanding of what transgender people deal with every day.

Before I dive into the review portion of this post, know that I get a commission for purchases made through some links in this post.

Okay.

The Transgender Manifesto, by Ian Thomas Malone (she/her), opens with a flashy celebration of transgender people and an open defiance against the gender binary. Structure-wise, the book is divided into many bite-sized chapters. In each chapter, she addresses various components of life as a transgender person. From discussing the validity of non-binary genders to tackling the all-too-common discrimination transgender people face in society to this day. Malone also inserts tidbits from LGBTQ+ history. And she delves into contemporary politics.

Perhaps most interesting is how she tackles prejudice. She outlines the most common arguments flung against the transgender community. And then? Malone systematically refutes them. The author doggedly breaks down each point, one by one. In this book, she goes from fiery to philosophical and back again. It’s pretty fabulous.

Rating: 5 out of 5


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning · Loreless · Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better · I Was Picked: The John Challis Story · The Touch: A Supernatural Story · Jake & The Dragons of Asheville · Kat Cubed

Multiverse Fiction
Book Reviews

Multiverse Fiction for Action Lovers

Where in the multiverse are we?

Multiverse Fiction
This week’s book is a science-fiction story that had me on the edge of my seat. It was written by a woman indie author who has some serious plotting and pacing chops if this book is anything to go by. Also, I really love the creative possibilities that the multiverse concept provides.

So, what is this fantastic book?

Before I get to that, I’d like to remind you that affiliate links have been added to this post for your convenience. Clicking them won’t make your browser go boom (I checked, twice). But if you decide to buy this super awesome book that I actually loved from the links, I will earn a commission. At absolutely no charge to you. Super salesy moment over now? You betchya! Okay, now let me tell you more about the story.

Kat Cubed, by Lesley L. Smith is a thrilling glimpse into humanity’s ability to survive despite seemingly insurmountable odds. The narrative contains 3 separate versions of the main character: Kat, Katherine, and Kaitlin. Hence, the title. Get it?

Each version of Kat lives in a different universe, completely oblivious to the others. That is, until something goes wonderfully, horribly wrong. Kat/Katherine/Kaitlin meet and explore each other’s vastly different dystopian versions of reality, learning more about themselves and the people they love along the way.

Perhaps the trickiest part about maintaining multiple separate universes within a single novel has to be the transitions from one universe to the next. Smith handles this beautifully with clearly labeled headings and the slightly different attitudes and quirks of each Kat.

For anyone who’s followed this blog for a while, you know I don’t always review books with such glowing praise. But this book really hit the spot.

Rating: 5 out of 5


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning · Loreless · Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better · I Was Picked: The John Challis Story · The Touch: A Supernatural Story · Jake & The Dragons of Asheville

dragon
Book Reviews

Dragon Book Worth Reading

Great read for any dragon lover.

dragon

Let’s face it, dragons are awesome. Take any ho-hum story, stick a dragon in it and BOOM! Magic happens. This week’s read isn’t boring by any standard. In fact, I enjoyed it way more than I thought I would. Right now, you might be asking:

Why didn’t you think you would like it?

Well, I’m so glad you asked! You know how some books do this meta thing where a character is reading a book? I have no idea why, but reading about characters who are reading has always annoyed me. (Even though I’ve also written characters who were reading. Hey, I didn’t say my opinions made any sense.) So, when the first and second chapters featured excerpts from a book one of the characters was reading, I got a little nervous. Was this entire novel going to be one giant case of Inception?

Thankfully, the answer is no. (I love Inception, by the way. Have I mentioned I’m weird?)

Okay. So now you might be asking:

What book are you even talking about?

Great question! This is where I pump the brakes and inform you there will be affiliate links up ahead. And I earn a commission (at no cost to you) from those links when you buy something. All clear? Sweet. Buckle up because this is going to be a fun ride.

Jake & the Dragons of Asheville, by Brian Kacica, is a magical tale that takes place in a small town in North Carolina. When met with tragic circumstances beyond his control, Jake Winston, the titular character, embarks on a journey to discover more about his family and his town’s history. But he’s still in school. Also, dragons may or may not be involved. Did I mention that there might be a dragon or two? Perhaps it slipped my mind.

Several other people who’ve read and reviewed this book have mentioned that some of the characters lack depth. This is absolutely true. The bully is stereotypical (strong and unintelligent). The weak love triangle features a vapid, hormone-addled teenage girl. There’s a wealthy man who only cares about his business and the main villain has exaggerated anger issues. However, I found these characters immensely humorous (or irritating depending on the situation). And, in my opinion, these characters are part of what made the book so enjoyable.

Most of all, this book really shines during the action scenes. The pacing is spot on, the action is intense. I would 100% watch this as a television show or movie. But don’t take my word for it. Get a copy and decide for yourself.

Dragon Book Recommendation

Rating: 4.9 out of 5 stars


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning · Loreless · Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better · I Was Picked: The John Challis Story · The Touch: A Supernatural Story

supernatural
Book Reviews

Supernatural Voices Can’t Be Unheard

A supernatural story.

supernatural

This week’s book has some imaginative ideas that pulled me right in. I love a good magical or supernatural story, especially if there’s a bit of mystery involved. And I confess I grabbed this book without reading the blurb first. What can I say? Old (bad) habits die hard. So, without further ado, here is my breakdown. (Oh yeah. There will be affiliate links after this point that help support my blog.)

The Touch: A Supernatural Story, by Robert E. Flynn III, has some things really working for it, as I mentioned before. Told in the third person, the narrative alternates character focus in different chapters with clean transitions. And the opening chapters really set up a lot of questions. What is going on in the oncology ward? And is that boy a ghost or something? As the story progresses, the questions begin to grow (and are ultimately answered). However, a few issues interfere with the unspooling of this supernatural tale.

Dialogue

Verbal exchanges between the characters sometimes felt overly vague and stilted. Oftentimes characters would rush in and make on-the-nose statements about their supernatural experiences that seemed forced. Also, the characters range in age from children to an adult in her 60s. In addition to this, there are characters from different socioeconomic backgrounds and countries. However, most of the characters use similar diction, pacing, and expressions when they speak. This is especially noticeable with the children. In my opinion, the only character with a unique voice was the Realtor (who is a minor character).

Telling

A great deal of the story describes the main characters’ supernatural experiences as they wrestle with positive and negative emotions. Though sometimes the experience is described in clear terms with strong adjectives and similes, many times it is not. When we are told how the character feels instead of being immersed in the experience, it feels repetitious and dull. Why begin to ask why we are revisiting a concept which has not changed.

Inconsistency

This is a relatively minor issue, but it did pull me out of the story for a bit. The first main character in the narrative is Alabama. She is set up as THE vessel for a supernatural mission, but it turns out her role is somewhat secondary. There is also the orphan, Josh. Initially, when Gabriel describes his supernatural experiences, Josh is surprised. However, later on the narrative treats Josh as one of the children who has also experienced the voice his whole life. This waffling over who is “chosen” and who is not is a bit confusing.

Ableism

This book throws out slurs against mental illness right and left. And it propagates some potentially harmful stereotypes about autism. Now, I am by no means an expert on autism and have made my own mistakes with writing about the spectrum in the past. However, after listening to several autistic people discuss harmful representation, I believe this story may fall into that category. It clearly isn’t written with overt or malicious intent. But it does make some assumptions and generalizations about people with autism that aren’t necessarily true. (Feel free to learn more about autism at the Autism Self Advocacy Network.)

In Conclusion…

This book has a lot of potential. It does an excellent job of setting up intriguing questions and not answering them right away. There are some biblical threads, so keep that in mind. Overall, it’s pretty creative.

Update: The author reached out to me and gave me permission to share this message which gives some insight into his process and what to expect in coming books.

Hello Ditrie! My name is Robert Flynn and I wanted to tell you I appreciated your review of my book! You were pretty dead-on with most of your critical input and just so you know, I am listening.

This is a first novel for me and I am working on the second installment in this short series. I am learning as I go and believe me, I realized many of the shortcomings you mentioned after I had a chance to absorb what I had written.

For example, you mentioned the monotony of the voice experiences. I think when I do the next edit, I will try to carve out some of that repetition. I also will try to find a way to add more nuance to a difficult literary problem with that situation.

Also, in terms of all the children speaking in the same way, even those from another country, I did not really concern myself with that. I mentioned they were all schooled in English and had access to modern technology to some degree, and it did not seem to be an issue for me. Possibly, I was mistaken and I will try to look at that again as well.

In terms of Josh, he heard the voice his entire life as well, but in more of a whisper. Josh is part of the plan and so is Alabama. More to be revealed in the next book! Again, I appreciate you taking the time to read and review it.

I’m grateful that my review is helping someone improve their craft. And I also appreciate this author’s humility and honesty. I’m looking forward to reading whatever he writes next.

 

The Touch: A Supernatural Story


Rating: 3.8 out of 5 stars


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning · Loreless · Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better · I Was Picked: The John Challis Story

A book about a young athlete's battle with cancer.
Book Reviews

A Heartbreaking Real-Life Cancer Story

Cancer sucks.

Cancer

This week’s book is about a young man who was taken too soon. Before we begin, I have a few confessions to make.

  1. I had never heard of this athlete prior to reading this book.
  2. I am not this book’s target audience.
  3. This review will contain affiliate links, and I receive a small commission from any purchases made through them.

Still with me? Great.

The Target Audience for This Heartbreaking Cancer Story

As I stated in number 2 above, this book wasn’t aimed at me. I know next to nothing about most sports. I have little to no experience with sports and am not nor have I ever been athletic in any way, shape, or form. Sports don’t connect to me on the same deep, emotional level that it can with some people. I respect the discipline, training, strength, and planning that goes into them, but I can’t personally relate. If you’re a huge sports fan, this book may resonate much more strongly with you.

Speaking of sports, hunting and fishing are involved. I respect peoples’ right to hunt for food and sport, but I’m an animal-loving vegetarian. The hunting scenes simply didn’t speak to me. Again, this story may appeal more to readers with experience tracking live game.

Finally, this story will really connect with religious people, particularly Christians and especially Catholics. There are several mentions of the bible and how personal faith helped the athlete and his family navigate their hardships. Though I appreciate that religion provided them with this positive support, I could not relate to this on a personal level. I believe Christian readers will find this book inspiring and even uplifting at times.

He Was Picked

I Was Picked: The John Challis Story, by Howard Shapiro is a deep dive into the life of John Challis. John was only in high school when he was diagnosed with liver and lung cancer. He fought back with a vengeance through sports and by spreading his message of courage and hope. This book contains photos of John’s journey as well as excerpts from interviews with his family and friends. Shapiro clearly segments each section, grouping interviews and data points together by theme. He conducted an incredible amount of research.

Even though I’m not the target audience, there is something about John’s message that applies to everyone. He reminds us that life is short. And through this book, he also urges us to live life to the fullest.

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning · Loreless · Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better

Break up
Book Reviews

Breakup Stories

A breakup is never easy.

Breakup

If you’ve ever been in a romantic relationship before, odds are you’ve experienced a moment where things weren’t quite right. Sometimes such kinks can be worked out, but sometimes a relationship is doomed to end. And there are acceptable ways to breakup a relationship, and there are some not so great ways to do it. This week’s book is a collection of personal breakup stories submitted to artist Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell.

The concept for the book began after Campbell suffered a heartbreak of her own. She realized that drawing cartoons about the situation helped to cheer her up. So, she decided to gather other people’s stories of romantic woe and illustrate them, as well. The result, was this book. (Also, links after this point are affiliate links which help support my blog.)

Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better is an extremely quick read. Definitely great for anyone who set up an absurdly high Goodreads challenge for themselves this year (like  I did) and needs to get caught up. The stories are brief, and the accompanying cartoons are cute.

Some of the accounts are told from the person who made the terrible breakup decision, which is something I wasn’t expecting as a reader. And some stories fly by so fast, it’s difficult to feel engaged with the accompanying emotions. However, this may be a therapeutic read for anyone currently dealing with romance-related heartache.

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

 


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning · Loreless