A book about a young athlete's battle with cancer.
Book Reviews

A Heartbreaking Real-Life Cancer Story

Cancer sucks.

Cancer

This week’s book is about a young man who was taken too soon. Before we begin, I have a few confessions to make.

  1. I had never heard of this athlete prior to reading this book.
  2. I am not this book’s target audience.
  3. This review will contain affiliate links, and I receive a small commission from any purchases made through them.

Still with me? Great.

The Target Audience for This Heartbreaking Cancer Story

As I stated in number 2 above, this book wasn’t aimed at me. I know next to nothing about most sports. I have little to no experience with sports and am not nor have I ever been athletic in any way, shape, or form. Sports don’t connect to me on the same deep, emotional level that it can with some people. I respect the discipline, training, strength, and planning that goes into them, but I can’t personally relate. If you’re a huge sports fan, this book may resonate much more strongly with you.

Speaking of sports, hunting and fishing are involved. I respect peoples’ right to hunt for food and sport, but I’m an animal-loving vegetarian. The hunting scenes simply didn’t speak to me. Again, this story may appeal more to readers with experience tracking live game.

Finally, this story will really connect with religious people, particularly Christians and especially Catholics. There are several mentions of the bible and how personal faith helped the athlete and his family navigate their hardships. Though I appreciate that religion provided them with this positive support, I could not relate to this on a personal level. I believe Christian readers will find this book inspiring and even uplifting at times.

He Was Picked

I Was Picked: The John Challis Story, by Howard Shapiro is a deep dive into the life of John Challis. John was only in high school when he was diagnosed with liver and lung cancer. He fought back with a vengeance through sports and by spreading his message of courage and hope. This book contains photos of John’s journey as well as excerpts from interviews with his family and friends. Shapiro clearly segments each section, grouping interviews and data points together by theme. He conducted an incredible amount of research.

Even though I’m not the target audience, there is something about John’s message that applies to everyone. He reminds us that life is short. And through this book, he also urges us to live life to the fullest.

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning · Loreless · Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better

Break up
Book Reviews

Breakup Stories

A breakup is never easy.

Breakup

If you’ve ever been in a romantic relationship before, odds are you’ve experienced a moment where things weren’t quite right. Sometimes such kinks can be worked out, but sometimes a relationship is doomed to end. And there are acceptable ways to breakup a relationship, and there are some not so great ways to do it. This week’s book is a collection of personal breakup stories submitted to artist Hilary Fitzgerald Campbell.

The concept for the book began after Campbell suffered a heartbreak of her own. She realized that drawing cartoons about the situation helped to cheer her up. So, she decided to gather other people’s stories of romantic woe and illustrate them, as well. The result, was this book. (Also, links after this point are affiliate links which help support my blog.)

Breaking Up Is Hard To Do… But You Could’ve Done Better is an extremely quick read. Definitely great for anyone who set up an absurdly high Goodreads challenge for themselves this year (like  I did) and needs to get caught up. The stories are brief, and the accompanying cartoons are cute.

Some of the accounts are told from the person who made the terrible breakup decision, which is something I wasn’t expecting as a reader. And some stories fly by so fast, it’s difficult to feel engaged with the accompanying emotions. However, this may be a therapeutic read for anyone currently dealing with romance-related heartache.

Rating: 4 out of 5 stars

 


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning · Loreless

Book Reviews

Cultural Fiction About a Man Discovering His Roots

Cultural fiction fresh from Australia.

cultural fiction

This week’s book was a refreshing change from last week’s read. I absolutely fell in love with this story and the incredible research and respect that went into making it. Though this isn’t an own voices book, PJ Whittlesea went to great lengths to treat the people in his story with deference. Obviously, I’m totally recommending this book. (Also, I’ve included affiliate links after this point that help support my blog.)

Loreless, by PJ Whittlsea, was a pleasure to read. The narrative follows Billy, a man of Australian indigenous decent raised in the city with no knowledge of his family’s traditional beliefs, as he gets lost in the desert only to find his true home. Written in third person, the structure of the novel interleaves Billy’s present experience with those of his ancestors. The ancestor chapters are presented chronologically starting with the most recent and working their way back. The interplay between the past and present chapters is haunting and lovely.

This story does contain a rape scene. But, Whittlesea handles it with incredible care, respect, and a sense of justice for the victim. It isn’t another case of highly-detailed shock-value sexual violence for male gratification. Instead, this scene demonstrates the devastating effects of colonialism.

If you’re coming to this book from the action/adventure frame of mind, you may find it lacking. This story doesn’t punch through bad guys to win the ultimate prize. It’s more meditative. Billy doesn’t run out and seize the day. Instead, the world flows toward him, and he picks which way to turn. He doesn’t actively change his world so much as reacts to it. Though Billy is the main character, it’s his ancestral past that acts on him, shaping him, protecting him, guiding him. I think this is lovely but recognize it may not be for everyone.

There’s one minor writing flaw in this book which popped out at me. Some passages lacked variation in sentence structure. I came across several instances of 8 or 9 sentences in a row that started with the word “He.” This made the rhythm feel a little weird sometimes. However, it’s a small issue that didn’t detract from my enjoyment of this book.

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery · The Lady Who Loved Lightning

Book Review
Book Reviews

Book Review: The Lady Who Loved Lightning

A book with space sex and lots of alcohol.

Book Review

Did you know? Every time you make an Amazon purchase from one of my links, you’re supporting this site.

I had such high hopes for this book. Really, I did. It had a gorgeous cover, positive reviews on Amazon and Goodreads. Plus, it’s the fourth in a series. Nobody gets to number four in a series without a really good story arc, right? (“Oh, Ditrie,” I can hear some of you saying. “You’re so innocent and naive.”)

I absolutely cannot speak for the other books in this series. Maybe they’re outstanding and this novel is a fluke.  Perhaps by not reading them first, I’m missing out on something. And that is the ONLY reason I’m not giving this book a rock-bottom rating.

The Lady Who Loved Lightning, by Robert A. Sullivan could have been much better. Here’s how.

Dialogue Tags

The sheer variety of dialogue tags in this book is mind-numbing. If you’re not sure what a dialogue tag is, it’s the word at the end of a quote that lets you know a character is speaking. They are words like said, asked, croaked, hollered, etc. Ideally, dialogue tags within a story are invisible. The reader briefly recognizes them as speech markers and moves on in the text. But when you have a dialogue tag that calls attention to itself, it breaks the flow of the narration and conversation. It creates a momentary hiccup in the pacing. This is an excellent technique to use SPARINGLY for special effects. But when it’s abused over and over throughout the course of an entire novel, it slows down the narrative until it’s nearly unreadable.

Adverbs

Don’t get me wrong. There’s nothing wrong with using adverbs. For anyone needing a refresher, an adverb is a word that describes how an action (verb) is done. They’re like adjectives for verbs. And adverbs usually end in -ly. You’ll find adverbs most often paired with common, plain, or weaker verbs. Too many adverbs is a sign of poor verb choices.

Observe. Which is more enticing?

  • She walked sultrily to the bar.
  • She sauntered to the bar.

It’s the second one, right? Using powerful and specific verbs avoids adverb abuse. This book, however, does not. In fact, there are even adverbs in most of the dialogue tags. Which is— why would you do this?

Plot?

In the book’s defense, many of these characters are carrying on a storyline that started earlier in the series. From what I can tell, that longer story arc includes time travel and other nifty technology. But this novel? It’s classified as a science fiction novel, but it reads like a failed stab at erotica. There are a bunch of people in space. They get drunk a lot and have sex. Much cheating ensues.

Oh yeah, and they find a planet, one of the leaders is going to be put on trial for something, and for some reason, they decide to tow a giant moon over to the planet they found to make it spin slower? Science aside, the plot is thin, and there is a lot of talking about nothing with equal amounts of nothing being done. But at least there’s tennis and surfing? And apparently, they set up mines at some point. No idea who the miners are since apparently these like 6-8 people are isolated in the middle of nowhere. And they’re sworn to secrecy about something.

Misogyny

Where do I begin? Every woman character is objectified at some point throughout this story. There’s a lot of butt slapping and undue emphasis on how tone said body parts are. And there’s actually a scene where a woman punishes her lover by waving her breasts at him to remind him of what he won’t have? If this were erotica, that might make some sense. Maybe. But there is some pretty well-written erotica out there with fantastic plots and zero misogyny. It can be done.

Every woman character in this book is portrayed as possessive, jealous, controlling, and absurdly attractive. The men characters, who are never physically described, constantly complain about women being in charge. They state outright how men can never win with women.

And evidently, these characters procured the best timeline via their earlier time travel expeditions in other books. But somehow, the men feel threatened and oppressed by women while simultaneously changing them around like underwear? And the relationship changes are abrupt with zero discussion between affected members except for an ‘oh, by the way’ after the man has conquered someone else. This isn’t a case of clearly established and respectful polyamory. It’s 100% objectification for the sole purpose of men’s pleasure.

And yes, there are trysts between women, but nothing similar between any of the men.

Actions and Transitions

There aren’t a whole lot of either. The majority of this story consists of dialogue between characters who are quoting other books, plays, songs, and shows. And there are a LOT of main characters to keep up with, but their personalities are almost interchangeable. Several times a scene starts out on one ship with a couple of characters exchanging dialogue and then suddenly there are more characters (who either are or aren’t on the ship) that butt into the conversation. It’s difficult to keep track of where everyone is. Oftentimes it feels like everyone’s on a cruise ship having one, big, long, drunken conversation interspersed with orgies.

I believe this book could benefit from a solid rewrite, professional editing, and a handful of sensitivity readers. It should also probably rebrand as erotica— but only if some sensitivity readers guide the process. Otherwise, I cannot in good faith recommend this book. I’m still putting the Amazon ad at the end so you can see the beautiful cover and read what other reviewers on Amazon have said.

 

Rating: 1.5 out of 5 stars

Any purchase made via the link below supports my site. Even if you buy a toaster oven instead of this book. Which, you probably should. Toaster ovens are awesome. This book is not.

 


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral · The Plainview Lottery

A book about a town that should have known better
Book Reviews

Book Review: The Plainview Lottery

A book about a town that should have known better.

A book about a town that should have known better

Did you know? Every time you make an Amazon purchase from one of my links, you’re supporting this site.

Before I dig into the meat of this book review, I’d like to acknowledge some mistakes I’ve made in the past and changes I’m making moving forward. In my previous book reviews, I’ve been pretty salesy. I would emphasize the positive aspects of a book while ignoring its blatant faults. Part of this was, indeed, motivated by a desire for clicks on my ads to hopefully increase my income (or to make any income, to be honest). However, part of it was also because I was anxious about criticizing other authors when my own writing is far from perfect. (I mean, who’s perfect?)

In the end, though, this isn’t really fair to you, dear stranger off the internet highway and/or subscriber to my blog. You deserve the whole truth, delivered in an entertaining and professional manner. And with that in mind, let me tell you what I think about this book.

The Plainview Lottery: A Town Learns a Hard Lesson in Basic Economics by Markas Dvaras (also known as Mark Hall), would probably have been better as a novella or a short story. All things considered, though, it really isn’t all that bad. The prose is clean, clear, and reminds me of Nathaniel Hawthorne. I love Nathaniel Hawthorne. And the plot of this book is similar to the Stone Soup folktale. I loved that story as a kid, so this really tapped into my nostalgia. However, because this is, at best, a novella-worthy idea stretched into a full-length novel, there are a few issues.

First, there is a lot of repetition. A LOT of it. The characters repeat lines and phrases. The narrative repeats descriptions of places and actions. Some of this verges on hypnosis. And as someone with genuine, clinically diagnosed OCD whose mental loops can be triggered by repetition, it was right on the border of uncomfortable for me. (Side note for those who are unaware due to popular misconceptions: OCD is less about handwashing and more about uninvited mental stutters. Think— anxiety and an annoying song had a kid. OCD manifests a little differently for different people. But that anxiety + annoying song analogy is EXTREMELY apt for me. But, I digress.)

Second, the townspeople who begin as naive, not very bright, and loveable start to take on a slightly creepy vibe as this charade draws out. And I don’t think it’s intentional because this is not a horror story. The citizens of Plainview obsessed over the lottery without openly questioning it. They walked around with chipper, happy-go-lucky attitudes for months. And it started to remind me more and more of The Stepford Wives (which, I admit, I’ve only seen the movie version thus far).

Third, we only meet about five women in the novel. And they’re all either accessories to their husbands or literally asked to make sandwiches. If I have to explain why this is a problem, you probably should unfollow my blog.

Fourth, with the exceptions of Old Man Miller and the strangers from out of town, all of the non-women characters feel like variations of the same person. They use the same phrases. Make the same unfunny jokes. Think the same thoughts. Again, refer to my earlier comparison to The Stepford Wives.

In the end, though, I can safely say the story does NOT have a scary twist. It is simply a folktale-like story drawn out way past its limit. But at its heart, it is an innocent parable about only wanting as much as you need. And who can’t use that reminder from time to time?

Rating: 3 out of 5 stars

Appreciate the improvements to my book reviews?

Please support my site. I’ve got a young dragon to feed.

 


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age · Shoebox Funeral

Book Reviews

Memoir Book Suggestion

A book about a farm with ten kids and a LOT of cats.

Must Read Book for Animal Lovers

Did you know? Every time you make an Amazon purchase from one of my links, you’re supporting this site.

Shoebox Funeral: Stories from Wolf Creek, by Elisabeth Voltz is an emotional journey through childhood on a farm. Set in Grove City, Pennsylvania, this book features lovely illustrations by Idil Gözde and an endless cast of four-legged and feathered critters. There’s a robot, too, but more on that later.

Told in a slow-rolling first person, this book reflects on the joy and pain brought about by the circle of life. Yet, this isn’t a story told through rose-tinted glasses. For every kitten born and duckling hatched, there’s a tale of horrific accidents and devastating disease. But the tragedies and heartache never stopped Elisabeth and her family from taking in and caring for the maimed and unwanted creatures neighbors dropped at their door.

And the book also has old photographs in the back. Some are pictures of the author and her family. But many are pictures of animals. And there’s also a picture of the family robot. But I don’t want to give too much away in this review, so you’ll have to get the book to find out more. Because when you have the background this author has, things are bound to get interesting.

Elisabeth Voltz was born on a farm in Grove City PA, the tenth child to a horticulturalist and a mathematician/exorcist.

~excerpt from the official Amazon blurb

Really, really interesting. So, get a copy to read more.

More By Elisabeth Voltz


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement · Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age

Book Reviews

Humor Book Recommendation

Time travel, spaceships, and a wizard with a grudge.


Did you know? Every time you make an Amazon purchase from one of my links, you’re supporting this site.

Don Quixote & Candide Seek Truth, Justice, and El Dorado in the Digital Age, by Stefan Soto (a.k.a. Stephen Doster) is a work of pure genius. Told entirely from Candide’s perspective, this book is full of wit and irony (a word whose meaning is debated several times by key characters). This is the perfect read for those well-versed in classic literature, but even those without that background will find this story entertaining.

Personally, I couldn’t stop myself from bursting out laughing at several scenes in the book. And the plot is well-crafted, too. I gasped several times as an unexpected twist unfolded or a new obstacle presented itself before our intrepid adventurers. (Okay, so maybe Candide wasn’t always all that intrepid.)

Part of what makes this novel magical is how deftly Soto/Doster weaves characters from other stories together.

In this re-imagining of literary history the two meet Cyrano De Bergerac, Merlin, Sherlock Holmes, the crew of the Starship Enterprise, Tom Sawyer, Huck Finn, Dean Moriarty , Elizabeth Darcy (née Bennett) Mr. Darcy and multitude of historical figures, and share unexpected encounters with people from their past.

~excerpt from official Amazon blurb

If you’re searching for a book with amazing characters, a stellar plot, and hilarious shenanigans, this is the book for you.

 

More by Stephen Doster

Goodreads: 10 Other Books

Website: Stephen Doster

Have you read this book? What did you think? Let us know in the comments below.


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God · Balfair’s Confinement

Book Reviews

Steam Punk Novella Recommendation

A secret project, a world shrouded in cloud, and a break for freedom.

Did you know? Every time you make an Amazon purchase from one of my links, you’re supporting this site.

Balfair’s Confinement, by Phil Williams, is a return to the world of Estalia (which I covered in an earlier review). Told mostly from the viewpoint of an engineer’s slave, this novella is rife with suspense.

Deni has spent most of her life in captivity and isolation, serving at the whim of an engineer who constantly threatens her with expulsion back to “the tattooed man.” Entirely surrounded by controlling and manipulative men, Deni struggles to find her voice and complete grueling tasks around the abandoned mansion.

But when the engineer and his assistant start to shroud their latest project in secrecy, Deni sees her chance. Can she figure out a way to use this knowledge to her advantage and set herself free?

The results may be devastating, but they will notice her at last – and she will be free.

~excerpt from the official Amazon blurb

If you enjoy mystery/suspense novellas with a steam punk setting, this is the book for you.

Content Warning Note: Deni experiences various forms of abuse which may be severely triggering to some readers. Some of these include scenes of gaslighting, verbal abuse, emotional abuse, sexual harassment, and sexual assault.

More by Phil Williams

Goodreads: 4 Other Books

Website: Phil Williams

Twitter: @fantasticphil

Facebook: Phil Williams Author

Thanks for stopping by, and I hope you enjoyed this post! Is there a particular book or genre you think I should review? Let me know in the comments below.


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear · Dragon God

I love books.
Book Reviews

YA Fantasy Book Recommendation

A kingdom divided, magic-wielding monks, and a whole lot of dragons.

Did you know? Every time you make an Amazon purchase from one of my links, you’re supporting this site.

Dragon God, by Ava Richardson, is a magical journey reminiscent of Anne McCaffrey’s Dragonriders of Pern. The story opens with Neill Torvald, the illegitimate son of a powerful warlord. Neill has been sent to a monastery of the Draconis Order as a student and a spy. Can he discover the source of the monks’ magical power, and do they really control dragons?

His peers at the monastery come from across the three kingdoms. One of his fellow students, Char, is the illegitimate daughter of a prince. She introduces him to Paxala, a dragon she’s secretly raised outside the monastery walls.

But when Niell’s brothers grow impatient and attack the monastery in a bid to seize power, he will have to decide where his loyalties lie: with his warlord father’s domain, or the new friends he has made in the wider world.

~Excerpt from the official Amazon blurb

If you love magic and a good dragon book, this is the novel for you.

Content Warning Note: The world of the book contains a race which is named after a racial slur for the Romani peoples and also contains negative stereotypes. Neill’s mother belonged to this race, and he endures a great deal of racism from teachers, peers, and half-siblings alike. For more information on why Roma and Romani are more appropriate terms than the widely used “g*psy” word, please read here.

More by Ava Richardson

Website: Ava Richardson Books

Goodreads: 17 books

Facebook: Ava Richardson Books

Thanks for stopping by, and I hope you enjoyed this post! Is there a particular book or genre you think I should review? Let me know in the comments below. Until next time I’m…

Wishing you the best,

Ditrie Marie Bowie


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love · The Bear


Image of Ditrie Marie Bowie

Ditrie Marie Bowie (née Sanchez) is a Puerto Rican in British Columbia, Canada who writes fiction. She is a member of the Alliance of Independent Authors (ALLi) and co-editor of Strange Stories to Tell in the Park. Bowie is also the creator of the webcomic, This Writer Can’t Draw. A classically trained pianist and former educator, she has lived in three different countries spanning two continents. And she met her spouse in a video game.


Free to Share, Not to Sell

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

I love books.
Book Reviews, writing

Psychological Thriller Book Recommendation

A five-year-old girl, her two-year-old brother, and a big black dog that isn’t a dog.


Did you know? Every time you make an Amazon purchase from one of my links, you’re supporting this site.

The Bear, by Claire Cameron, is a haunting journey through the woods. This first person narrative is told through the perspective of a five-year-old girl. The choppy language and rambling sentences pull the reader into the child’s view but also acts as an effective veil when the main character, Anna, comes across scenes her mind is still too young to process.

The bulk of the story takes place on a remote island where Anna and her family are camping. She is woken in the middle of the night by screaming. Sleepy and confused, Anna thinks her father is angry when he hides her and her younger brother, “Stick,” inside a cooler. Though there’s actually a bear attacking her family, she mistakes it for a big black dog with really bad breath. When the crunching noises subside, Anna escapes from the cooler and finds her mother.

At her dying mother’s urging, Anna manages to get her brother into the family’s canoe and paddle away. But when the canoe runs aground on the edge of the woods, the sister and brother must battle hunger, the elements, and a wilderness alive with danger.

~Excerpt from the official Amazon blurb

If you’re searching for a unique and powerful novel about family and the will to survive, this is the book for you.

More by Claire Cameron

Website: Claire Cameron

Goodreads: 3 books

Twitter: @clairecameron

Facebook: Claire Cameron Author

Instagram: clairecamer0n

Thanks for stopping by, and I hope you enjoyed this post! Is there a particular book or genre you think I should review? Let me know in the comments below. Until next time I’m…

Wishing you the best,

Ditrie Marie Bowie


Did You Catch These Book Reviews?

Issola · Reversion · The Dead Room · Naheli’s Sacrifice · The Reviled · After Jessica · Running Out of Time · Wixon’s Day · Little Computer People · The Book of Jhereg · The Adventures of Technicality Man · When the Future Comes Too Soon · Love is Love


Image of Ditrie Marie Bowie

Ditrie Marie Bowie (née Sanchez) is a Puerto Rican in British Columbia, Canada who writes fiction. She is a member of the Alliance of Independent Authors (ALLi) and co-editor of Strange Stories to Tell in the Park. Bowie is also the creator of the webcomic, This Writer Can’t Draw. A classically trained pianist and former educator, she has lived in three different countries spanning two continents. And she met her spouse in a video game.


Got what it takes to top the leader boards?

LP QUEST

Image of an old fashioned arcade machine.

I’m counting on you.


Free to Share, Not to Sell

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.