Posted on Leave a comment

A Book that Tamed the Ultimate Bad Boy

Bride holding a bouquet

Bride holding a bouquet

Photo by Orio Nguyen on Unsplash

Today’s book contains graphic language and several sex scenes and sexual references. If this is something you’d rather avoid in a book, absolutely no judgment here. Thank you for stopping by, and I’ll catch you next week. 🙂

Marriage isn't Always All it's Cracked Up to Be: a book review.

If you buy something through these links, I get paid. I never recommend anything that I don’t believe is an interesting and high-quality product. See my Disclosure Page for more information.


When I Let You Go, by Lily Foster is the sixth book in her Let Me series. If you’ve read this blog any amount of time, you probably already know that I rarely read a series in order. But this series focuses on a small group of upper-class families through at least a couple of generations, so there is a rich history that unfolds from one book to the next. However, for people who read out of order, like me, this novel is fairly easy to follow— although the shift from the prologue to the first chapter was a bit disorienting (to me) at first.

This is THE book to read if you want to follow a character that you’ll love to hate. Dylan is a middle-aged husband with a frat-boy soul. The outright misogyny that leaks off the page from his point of view is horrifying, but (unfortunately) realistic. His character arc, alone, is worth the read. But the book also features a romance between two characters with a huge age gap between them. And this brings up a lot of super weird and uncomfortable moments in the book that are simply beautifully written. Though you may not quite care for the characters at first, you will probably find yourself rooting for them in the end. The pacing and interleaving of points of view are so masterfully done, that I swallowed this whole book in a night. That is incredibly rare for me and goes to show just how skilled Lily Foster’s writing ability really is.

Posted on Leave a comment

Read About Romance on a Greek Island

The main characters may not be Greek gods, but they are every bit as dramatic.

Ancient Greek statue fountain.
Today’s book is one to add to your Valentine’s Day reading list. Especially if you like your romance novels ultra steamy. If sex scenes are not your thing, you should probably pass on this one. (But if they are your thing, this book has a lot of well-written ones.)

Some More Warnings:

Since the story is set in the 1970s, there are some slurs against the Romani people, mentally ill people, and disabled people which were common use at the time. And if kidnapping, descriptions of food, swimming accidents, and ambiguous consent issues are difficult for you to read, you may wish to choose another book. Also, there are birds. Lots of birds.

Still with me?

Great. Let’s dive in.

Romance on a Greek Island: A Book ReviewIf you buy something through these links, I get paid. I never recommend anything that I don’t believe is an interesting and high-quality product. See my Disclosure Page for more information.

Aphrodite’s Tears, by Hannah Fielding, centers around the fictional island of Helios. Oriel, the heroine, is a British archeologist who is contracted to work there by the island’s leader— Damian Lekkas. But the island is rife with gossip, secrets, superstition, and danger. With so many varying accounts, it’s difficult for her to uncover the truth, especially when Damian is so distracting.

The narration is replete with visual descriptions of the island, buildings, artifacts, food, and clothing. In my opinion, this slowed the pace down, but that may also be due to my borderline aphantasia. If you enjoy detailed narration to give you a visual sense of location, the pace may flow much quicker for you.

Dialogue throughout the book is sprinkled with Greek, and the plot works in some of the finer points of old Greek customs and traditions. Also, the romantic conflict between Oriel and Damian is incredibly well-structured. But will Oriel survive the island’s many dangers long enough for a happily ever after? Does she even want a happily ever after? You’ll have to read the book to find out. 😉

PS: Add this book to your Valentine’s Day reading list!

Buy it here, and I’ll get some money.

Buy it here, and I get nothing. 

Posted on Leave a comment

This Book Explores #MeToo Issues Before the Movement Even Began

Broken pieces of a ceramic plate are scattered on a smooth concrete floor.

Broken pieces of a ceramic plate are scattered on a smooth concrete floor.

Photo by chuttersnap on Unsplash

If you are opposed to strong verbal language, sex scenes and/or might be triggered by depictions of sexual assault and bullying, this book is not for you. And I’m not going to waste your time today.

But if you’re still with me, we’re about to dive into a New Adult (NA) novel that does some pretty extraordinary things. Ready? Grab your hat because we’re going to cover a lot of ground pretty fast.

If you buy something through these links, I get paid. I never recommend anything that I don’t believe is an interesting and high-quality product. See my Disclosure Page for more information.

Published in January of 2017, Let Me Fall, by Lily Foster is a heartbreaking yet satisfying coming-of-age read. The narrative follows two characters, Carolyn and Jeremy, as they navigate their messy world from middle school through their early twenties. But this book doesn’t get bogged down in flashbacks, info dumps, or any of the other literary sins that can make novels unappealing. In fact, it flows along at a nice pace without any lulls. And the angst and pain the characters experience is palpable.

But what I love about this book more than anything else is how seamlessly it addresses a variety of difficult issues without ever glorifying or romanticizing them:

  • Differences in socioeconomic class
  • Sexual abuse
  • Child abuse
  • Mental illness
  • Harassment
  • Bullying
  • Dyslexia
  • Consent
  • Alcoholism
  • Suicide

Each of these issues is subtly woven into the fabric of the story without ever seeming forced or preachy. Instead, Foster paints scenarios in a realistic light that all too many of us understand, firsthand.

As an older Millennial who grew up before smartphones and taught younger Millenials as well as part of Generation Z, I was especially affected by the online bullying scenes. It is something I never had to experience at that emotionally and mentally vulnerable stage of life yet is a very real threat to today’s youth. And this novel does an excellent job describing both the subtlety and the absolute horror that can be unleashed.

Graffiti heart on a wooden park bench.

Photo by Jamez Picard on Unsplash

However, at its heart, this book is a love story. Will Jeremey and Carolyn overcome their hurdles and finally get together? I’m not giving away any spoilers. But whether or not they actually become a couple in the book, I totally ship it. And you will, too.

PS: Don’t forget to buy this book!

Buy it here and I’ll get some money to pay bills and keep this site running.

Buy it here and I get nothing. (I won’t judge. You do you.)